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 The Importance of Unpreparedness

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Pezer
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PostSubject: The Importance of Unpreparedness   Wed May 09, 2012 3:13 pm

What is it about chaos that is so important to life?

We are reminded, by this single immutable concept, that...

But we mustn't touch it for too long, it betrays easily. Just remember, when everything is easy and you understand perfectly, it is beautiful. If you seek it out once again, you are missing out.

But even this is too petrified.

In the words of Nietzsche: "The unexpected has always found me equal to it; I must be unprepared if I am to be master of myself. "
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PostSubject: Re: The Importance of Unpreparedness   Sat Jun 02, 2012 12:08 am

The more chaos also the more possibility, the more potential for novel and stimulating encounter, for difference (can not chaos alternately be defined as possibility?). Chaos is the stimulus to life, to order, and life is nothing but the careful partial-ordering of "chaos" (of what it cannot order). This must always be partial, it can never approach a totality, and the creative mind will always generate for itself more possibilities the more it also increasingly generates its own order. Like a computer that would run out of operations if it processed too much too quickly, the mind needs stimulus to function, and the philosophical mind secures its own stimulus by never reaching beyond context, structure, finite and necessary constraint. This is precisely why the "metaphysical impulse", the drive to unlimited knowledge or consciousness, to absolute and axiomatic tuth is an impulse to death, to "orderness existence", chaos (but this "metaphysical" drive, when itself placed within limitation indeed becomes a powerful tool in the service of life and 'order').


Chaos operates analogously to limit, to ignorance, to 'the threshhold' while order operates analogously to knowledge, positive content. "Life" maintains itself to the extent that it harnesses the former in light of the latter, that it "harmonizes" these. This is "healthful life" in the sense which Nietzsche meant it. But one may also harness positive content and truth toward the ends of developing better limitations; this method of conscious life has scarcely been explored, scarcely dared even to exist. As with Nietzsche's "Spirit is the life that cuts into life" we might also say, "Truth is the health that cuts into health". For a better explanation of this approach you can read elsewhere on this forum Parodites' comments on 'the daemonic'.


The recognition of the importance of chaos, of the unknown on the unconscious, instinctual level translates into that sense of which Nietzsche spoke, in the quote you mention. A love of chance, risk, of all manner of yet-unknown stimulus, a feeling of great horizons. A vital resistance to "being too careful" for its own sake, for the sake of "always being prepared", while the philosopher and the explorer find their higher stimulus and prize in being unprepared for here does one best approach himself and life most honestly, most genuinely and fully and indeed with a "wild and terrible laughter". A small man will suffer of life and cloister himself up in self-defense, driven by anxiety; a great man will suffer of himself and open his arms to life, driven by a need to draw within himself as much experience and vital novelty as possible in order to stimulate his consciousness and secure for himself a "creative control" in which every difference, every chaos, every unknown represents a new horizon of further possibility. The weak are ashamed of their weakness and wish not to confront it, wish to enjoy its absence; the strong are proud of their strength and wish to flex it, to enjoy it. Nietzsche's psychology of man at least got this right.

 

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"Since the old God has abdicated, I shall rule the world from now on." --Nietzsche

"Do you hold out hope, then?" ... "I hold out dignity." ... "She will need opiates before long, for the pain. She will cease being who she is." ... "Then I will love who she becomes."  --Penny Dreadful
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PostSubject: Re: The Importance of Unpreparedness   Fri Jun 21, 2013 1:26 pm

Pezer wrote:
Quote :
Quote :
What is it about chaos that is so important to life?

From experience, I've come to slowly intuit/realize and to know that chaos leads us to be aware of how very little control we have in our lives and how quickly life can change for us. That can be fearful but at the same time, it is a very important wake-up call. I find that we do not always learn this right away. We must have dose after dose of it until it's reached a level of awareness that we "experience" rather than simply "know".
 
Chaos allows us to begin to understand that life is not necessarily that beautiful, as many of us tend to say though at times it may seem beautiful. Life changes. All we can say is that at this moment in time life appears to be beautiful "to me".  Chaos helps us to see ALSO the horrible tragic facts about life. It helps us to see and understand that uttering the words "life is beautiful" is like looking at life through rose-colored glasses and seeing it as such and not realizing that we all look at life through difference lenses, that we all experience life differently, that life is not beautiful for some but is horrible and tragic. Chaos rears its ugly head and shows us with what  blind trust and faith we have walked through life, how asleep we have been, how asleep we are, what fools we are to go through life thinking that life and the universe is written in stone, is never changing - that we are not at times at the mercy of the ever ebbing and flowing ocean of life. Chaos paints a canvas for us on which there is a panorama of all things, everything, which is composed of the good, the beautiful, the ugly, the horrible and tragic - all things being different.

It may be important to our growth, but it is not necessarily welcome unless one is masochistic.

Quote :

In the words of Nietzsche: "The unexpected has always found me equal to it; I must be unprepared if I am to be master of myself. "
I'm not sure how real he was being when he uttered or wrote these words but perhaps at a certain point in time we come to realize that we have "grown" into being, if not equal to the unexpected and to chaos, at least better prepared as a warrior would be. But I think that that can only happen when we've questioned and begun to realize, REALLY, how prepared can we actually be until we have met up with it face to face? What Nietzche says probably was said in hinsdsight...but does he remember how prepared he was at first glance? But the true value of the unexpected and chaos may show itself in a human transcending it and itself with possible human growth and awareness.
Quote :
But we mustn't touch it for too long, it betrays easily. Just remember, when everything is easy and you understand perfectly, it is beautiful. If you seek it out once again, you are missing out.

But even this is too petrified.

I probably do not quite understand what you mean by "if you seek it out" but perhaps it is best to simply live in the moment - both the beautiful and the harsh moment. We take life as it comes.

Well, I think that we need to reflect on life and how changeable it is - this gives armor to the warrior. But not to excess or to obsess but to look and see and hear simply. Well, at times life does seem to be a war which we are at odds with. When everything appears to be easy, there is a gift there which also reminds us that there is the opposite side of the coin.


But to find some kind of balance, knowing that at some point life may change again, chaos may come to us like a deluge - so that we may be grateful for the present moments but at the same time, like the warrior or the zen buddhist be prepared for the inevitability of life...but not like one waits for the sword of damocles to fall.

But I don't suppose I am saying anything new here. 

 

 

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Each of our lives is a part of the lengthy process of the universe gradually waking up and becoming aware of itself.


Philosophy is the childhood of the intellect, and a culture that tries to skip it will never grow up."


"If I thought that everything I did was determined by my circumstancse and my psychological condition, I would feel trapped."

Thomas Nagel
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