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 Albert Camus

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Fixed Cross
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PostSubject: Albert Camus   Tue Oct 18, 2016 10:18 pm

Where I am able to read the tongue I prefer to stick to it, so I have only read a few of his works that I could manage, which is only one book of fiction, his first (the second I tried, one where he begins in the coach through the desert under pacific cloudscapes was impossible at my level)  and three notebooks. I took the privilege of translating from them some aphorisms. He is the supreme french aphorist to my taste. A full blown Nietzsche-type in the form of a French Arab who went through World War 2 as a Communist and lost faith - or so I read him. He became, basically, a Dostoyevsky. Which is not bearable as a Frenchman, let alone as an Arab. I jest. What do I know. But he did turn to Dostoyevskian instights and thus wisely escaped old age. His 80 year old insights would have demolished the European spirit. Only he would have been able to endure them.

Here are some entries - I pick the shortest ones for convenience but also because they tend to be the clearest, least introverted ones. I only have the first book with me, plus his first novel, l'Etranger, which is maybe the best novel I ever read - now that surpasses Dylan with ease - but then he is a philosopher, and the only one I know of that had it in him to write novels. I enjoyed having to struggle with the French, it added to the utter sweaty displacement that only existentialist novelists produce. Superior to Nietzsche, in a very real sense. N would have adored him I reckon and be tempted to see in him a superman. His disappointment especially - French Cynicism - bloodiest shit ever. In extremo: Celine. Voyage au bout de la Nuit - but that was not a philosopher.

Camus, on the other hand, is perhaps the only one of the twentieth century that has my full blessing. Heidegger is not a full philosopher, he is a Nietzschean miner and forger, a full servant. Highly meritable, but in the shadows. Camus lived in the Sun. His first novel is mainly about the blindingness of the sun.



1937



The desire to be right is the mark of a vulgar spirit.



The most dangerous temptation: to resemble nothing.



Philosophies are worth what philosophers are worth. The greater a man is, the truer his philosophy.



August
Tenderness and emotion of Paris. The cats, the children, the abandon of the people. The grey colors, the sky, a great parade of stone and waters.



Two characters. Suicide of one?



Arrived in Prague - until the departure - sickness.
Explanation - Lucile - Gone.



August
Absence of Spanish philosophers.



Montherlant: I am he to whom something happens.


In this first notebook he is besides already a genius of pathos and existence really very young and naive, shallow, lazy compared to what he begins to do in the second, which takes place during the second world war. In Camus there is the developing man par excellence, a rare type of philosopher- we can see his death as a final conclusion of his time. He saw it all coming and said that is all too dishonest and weak for me. He knew the dishonesty and weakness too well, from a position of Charm.

A privileged mind, we're privileged to have his writings.

 

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PostSubject: Re: Albert Camus   Wed Oct 19, 2016 5:28 am

I was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

And pleasantly surprised that you saw the philosopher in him.

Yes, I think it can be fairly said that he was a Nietzschean.

Many people labelled him an Existentialist but I believe his philosophical battle was actually against existential thought.

In my mind, one of his final conclusions was that life (human life) is absurd but it is still worth living.

And some accused him of killing himself in an auto accident but that is totally false because he never even drove a car. He was a passenger in the car of the accident that killed him.

Yes, before becoming a novelist he was a political journalist. He was anti- German Nazi mentality. In my reading I never associated him with Communism. However, I think it would be rather easy to link him to Socialism.

It was from him that I took up the label of Cosmopolitan - a world without nations and borders.

I think "The Stranger" was the first work of his that I read as well. Or maybe it was "The Plague". Later came "The Myth Of Sisyphus"; the source of my user name on this forum.

Camus acknowledged Nietzsche's greatness. But he felt that Nietzsche had not completed his work before dying. And I agree with you, had Nietzsche known him Nietzsche would likely used him as an example of the overman.

Thanks for starting this thread Fixed Cross.


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PostSubject: Re: Albert Camus   Mon Nov 21, 2016 6:16 pm

Fixed Cross wrote:



The desire to be right is the mark of a vulgar spirit.



The most dangerous temptation: to resemble nothing.



Philosophies are worth what philosophers are worth. The greater a man is, the truer his philosophy.



August
Tenderness and emotion of Paris. The cats, the children, the abandon of the people. The grey colors, the sky, a great parade of stone and waters.



Two characters. Suicide of one?



Arrived in Prague - until the departure - sickness.
Explanation - Lucile - Gone.



August
Absence of Spanish philosophers.



Montherlant: I am he to whom something happens.
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Poetry mixed with lies. "Fill in the gaps, fill in the blanks, fix my lies for me" kind of game. Meaning making.


"The desire to be right is the mark of a vulgar spirit."
At times, yes. I suppose you'd consider me vulgar right now. Demons of Truth can be vulgar.
But who knows what that comment means. Could mean some hippie bullshit, about how the desire to be right is the desire to avoid shame, and so it conflates the "desire to be right" with "the desire to lie to avoid shame" which is vulgar the liar or the truther? Feeble poetry.

"The most dangerous temptation: to resemble nothing."
How is it dangerous? In what way is it dangerous? And when does this temptation arise?

"Philosophies are worth what philosophers are worth. The greater a man is, the truer his philosophy."
This is a lie, an old Roman woman in her kitchen babbling. Define greatness, secondarily, A complete retard can say 2+2=4, although, there is a tendency For truth to come from truthful men, but there are also happy accidents like the french fry.

camus wrote:
August
Tenderness and emotion of Paris. The cats, the children, the abandon of the people. The grey colors, the sky, a great parade of stone and waters.



Two characters. Suicide of one?



Arrived in Prague - until the departure - sickness.
Explanation - Lucile - Gone.



August
Absence of Spanish philosophers.



Montherlant: I am he to whom something happens.

What the fuck is this shit? An emo chick's writings?

These are like, Chapter Titles from his book right, not actual quotes, correct? geek
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PostSubject: Re: Albert Camus   Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:57 pm

The differences in taste between the repliers is the main thing I'd like to note.
Art does that, split by taste.
Truth. Camus is deeply truthful. His superficialness is far truer than most philosophers mining of their own presumptions.

Kant is a dandy, a ridiculous pomp. Camus by comparison is a man with balls like deathstars.

But these phrases arent meant to be deep - they are just entires in a diary.

 

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PostSubject: Re: Albert Camus   Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:13 am

Fixed Cross wrote:
The differences in taste between the repliers is the main thing I'd like to note.
Art does that, split by taste.
Truth. Camus is deeply truthful. His superficialness is far truer than most philosophers mining of their own presumptions.

Kant is a dandy, a ridiculous pomp. Camus by comparison is a man with balls like deathstars.

But these phrases arent meant to be deep - they are just entires in a diary.

Yep. That was what inspired me to read Camus. He adds no flowers to his truths. Simply life as he saw it.

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - A Camus
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