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 What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 5:58 am

Fixed Cross wrote:

I do find that Parodites and Capable are on to vital fleshed out notions of morality beyond what N took on himself -- we must accept that N perished even of how much he took on, his plan was never for himself to carry the entirety of his philosophy; he spent himself fully so as to become a seed. And from this seed I have grown my notion. And Ive upheld the Nietzschean notion and arrived at value ontology through that, so I wont be the one to object to your statement here certainly as coming from a Taoist I suspect a simply truthfulness behind it. Nietzsche once called Buddhism a hygiene. I do experience zen as a mental hygiene. All things are rooted in themselves, and thoughts are things. I do not create thoughts. Well Ive created one thought, value ontology, out of the void.

Yes, Nietzsche spoke kindly of Buddhism. That actually surprised me but his logic was good.

To my knowledge he never mentioned Taoism but then there were only a couple translations while he was alive and they were only in English.

And I don't recall Nietzsche ever claiming to be a overman. His desire was to teach us how to become.

Yes, values as opposed to morals. That's because, from my perspective, values are personal whereas morals are others' demands upon us.
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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 10:19 am

Capable

Quote :
Morality does a few things, one of which is to create a new plane of significance for things. An easy example is when someone wrongs you somehow (let's say a boss at work) and you take steps to correct it by talking to HR; now your boss makes some changes and tries to be a little better and might even apologize to you, they might even be sincere in the apology. All fine and good, but none of this is morality.

That's the thing about morality - it can be highly subjective and not necessarily based on what is "real".
What I would have done in this scenario is to try to speak, to communicate with my boss, to see what the real problem is and try to smooth things over rather than first going over his head to HR. That would have been the "practical" side of morality for me - aiming for mutual understanding.
Things might not be so easily resolved on either side if someone else has to make the decision regarding their business relationship.




Quote :
Morality comes in when you elevate the interaction and its resolution to a meaning and lasting significance beyond the bounds of the interaction and its resolution. You do this by, for example, continuing to feel the affront even after it has been resolved or by continuing to focus on the resolution and the rightfulness of how it was handled in a way that was adequate or not adequate; basically you force the situation and its meaning to linger beyond the situation itself. This is one function of morality. Morality activates certain meanings to new regions where they persist longer than otherwise they would.

Yes, because a third party got involved and so their probably wasn't so much of a mutual understanding and agreement afterwards.
But I think that it would also be determined by the personalities of the two involved - being able to "let go" and begin fresh.


Quote :

This moral extension as fidelity to the Eternal of meaning is therefore a certain kind of remembering: one remembers and continues to hold as significant the meaning and fact of something long after that 'something' has ended, or even concluded satisfactorily.

Some things have wonderful meaning in our lives. Holding onto these things are a part of appreciation and gratitude.
As for the negative side of remembering, we need to learn to be realistic nihilists, to let go of those memories which do not serve us but continue
to go against the grain of our emotions.

 

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Philosophy is the childhood of the intellect, and a culture that tries to skip it will never grow up."


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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:18 am

Fixed Cross wrote:
Capable wrote:
Institutions strip individuality from people, like stripping flesh from bone. Institutions are probably necessary, but what the fuck are they really?

Institution-ism blurs the line between self-life and work-life. "Work life balance" they call it today, usually with a good dose of cynically irony and the half smile you give to a kid who asks about Santa.

Yes - it is halfheartedness. The first nominal institutions were always populated by eunuchs, it seems. I think a bureaucrat is somehow the equivalent of a eunuch.


However, we can build a non bureaucratic institution- a first perhaps - taking VO as the institutional center-self-valuing and valuing designated parts of our work purely in terms of it,  as we've been doing quite consciously up here of course, why we made things like the Pentad and the Tower, which emptiness is testament to its functioning, just as the Pentads sporadic action clearly pushes philosophy forth seismically.  VO is capable of being an institution (it even brings about institutions entirely dedicated to discrediting it, thereby building interest in it) that serves only to create space for a philosopher to do his own bidding. So that a man like Parodites can be supported by an institution, which means that he commands that institutions standards - as with VO It is simply the highest standard that brings all others under it. It is thus not an empty placeholder but a container of an asymptotically approached absolute; the value of value, the standard of standard - these work 'magically' - that is to say as fully potentiating every intent that is addressed at it qua its logic, that is to say, properly. VO commands "standard-as-such"...

shit.


Thats hard.


And that is why I can safely let a Parodites roam the skies above me as I chop the wood for a fire, just as I can let you be a thundercloudscape as I put together an engine, or I can follow Pezers field-directions, or dance with the ultimate discord that Sauwelios creates in peoples hearts, hahaha -- that guy. He will always remain unfathomable.  He truly lives with the goddesses. This is why he is so utterly undriven to be assertive; is existence itself is an assertion against all things that are around him. Generally it is accepted as a very mild, elevating, soothing, cultivating presence - no one who is in a room with Sauwelios can not like him - and he can not not suffer anyone - but online it is the opposite. He suffers no one, and no one is allowed truly close. Except I, since I have conquered with VO - but it was only when I had accidentally managed to cause him to stray onto his own path into it that I truly believed VO could rule. S understands N as Nietzsche understood himself, I think. I think also this is why he takes all these vast circular roads around the hot core - compare it to Eris' orbit. The aim is to be both the Sun and the most distant satellite. In astrology, Pluto is assigned to subterranean power ('control', 'minerals', 'sex in art', etc), Eris isnt assigned to much yet beyond being given that name - not unfittingly, as as she entered Aries, long before she was discovered, the age of global wars began - she is not far from entering Taurus now, and I am certain that this will be the time that the Earth will come to fall into actual possession of discrete groups, whoever are the most capable two and a half (meta-)parties, Rulerships, Ideologies, Values by then. (I think this number is the lock - two on equal terms qua quantum of power in their own right, and a third that is needed by both to take from the other what they need. This 'half' is the resolution of the idea of the zero, and it is thus also clear which party is gong to represent this middle; this is perhaps the same as this 'evil' or 'courage' of the consolidated distance from the absolute; the absolute freedom of Arabs as traders, the engine to their religious might, their sheer manners, standards of transaction, the awareness that wealth is in transaction) But possession is a concept that only the Chinese and the English seem to understand effectively in global terms. Why Hong Kong was the ennobling center of cold war economy.  In Europe, it is the Austrians and Northern Italians. Switzerland and Germany their antipodes. Switzerland understands possession entirely locally, is the most genius selfvaluing on the planet, the oldest nation of the west and also the only one unconquered. It is host to Nestle and Cern, secret banking, (naturally they just moved to a deeper layer of secrecy when they 'gave up the secrets'- pruned the tree of wealth to grow much taller) and if there s any nation that knows it will keep forever conquering it is the Swiss. Ive been held by them for some hours on my way through, the way they carry their automatic weapons in their basically lederhosen-uniforms is just too comfortable. They also have the highest heroin addiction rate.  You are either filthy rich powerborker or absolutely off the grid. Switzerland is slowly assimilating Europe to itself and using Germany as the plasma. And thats perfectly natural, because it is the center of the continent and they have bloody well earned it with their war record, and back this up with inventions like the Swiss army knife, perhaps the singular Object of this world, precisely in its phallic multifariousness () and sheer applicability. Man is a tool to create tools, said Bergson I believe, or a tool to create tools to create tools... not that I agree, but the Swiss know how to work this definition. I do not admire them. They have no culture and a filthy dialect in all their 4 languages. I admire the Austrians, who are the cultural center of the continent, and somehow merge into the Swiss in the Alps after Innsbruck... I once drove to Italy over Innsbruck and had a steak with berries and whipped cream on a mountainside terrace, and felt for the first time that I had found 'the good place' - not as in great exaltation, but as in utterly unto-itself. Happening to be quite high up and amidst brook-veined forest. Then I passed down into Italy!!!

I've actually been to Innsbruck one time, great place.

I think VO describes why institutions are impossible. All the institutions that presently exist flirt with this impossibility as their repressed reality principle, always trying to overcome this limit and always failing to do so. Institutions must be inhuman qua institution, so the trick is to keep a large gap between the hard logic of the institution-ism and the human beings who staff it. This is one applicatiok I came up with for artificial intelligence, that it can take over much of the functions of staffing institutions for doing the menial work. I think we're already moving in that direction.

A single cluster of AI minds could operate even the most massive and complex institutions. But this would put a lot of peoole out of work. That's the contradiction deep in technological capitalism: "work" loses its human-ness and so is eventually to be replaced by non-humans, but by then millions of people are already employed in these heartless systems.

A family or group of friends is how I think of a VO institution. Not really an institution but a natural rank-ordering as human relationships that also mediates power-concerns. In this way your preference for mafia structures in business and politics makes sense. But there are severe detriments however we look at it, whether there is heartless inhuman bureaucracies of institutions or mafia families in charge. Trump is a little bit of return to the mafia-oriented logic, maybe this is what the inhuman institutional behemoth needs right now.

 

___________
"We must, now armed with such a language, realize the “transcendental unity of ideas,” through a new morality that aims, not to hypostasize experience and grasp in positive knowledge a series of particular virtues and vices, but rather to fully explicate this continuity; where philosophy exists to represent this transcendental order, morality most exist to mediate the two spheres, the spheres of experience and ideality." -Parodites

"Was it necessary for the sense of truth that Nietzsche described as developed by the Judeo-Christian tradition that then manifested itself in the scientific methodology to turn against the symbolic foundation of that structure and demolish it... Jung's answer was that the conflict between science and religion is a consequence of the immature state of both of those domains of thinking... it's just that we aren't good enough at being religious or at being scientific to see how they might be reconciled." -Jordan Peterson
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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:48 am

Fixed Cross wrote:
That's an elegant and highly effective definition.
Beyond that it is practical and itself free of moral judgment, I wouldn't say it is extremely Nietzschean, as if there is any place where N gets moral and superfluous in meaning it is in defining morality, which is why he then vomits it out, I think. Not his forte.

However I would like to address what, in this practical definition of what morality is, a Nietzschean morality is.

As is said, a morality stretches out the significant of an event beyond itself.
The significance of that event (to the selfvaluing) we may call its moral value.

So what is a moral value that stretches out beyond its own event, in a Nietzschean?

The answer is very convenient and clear: Pride.

As a Nietzschean, I have upheld this morality. When someone adds to my pride, that is ths philosophical pride I am talking about, that person acquires a value that pertains to a greater Value, namely the great signifier of morality, which is the capacity for pride.
Nietzschean pride is possibly the most comprehensive pride so far, as it extends to areas like factuality. A man like say 'turd ferguson' as boastful as he is, has no pride, in this sense, as he has no joy in addressing things factually.

When someone negatively addresses my (philosophic) Pride, that person becomes, in my psychological-emotional system, a non-entity. I take massive delight in deconstructing that entity in my mind, and seeing the weaknesses by which it hangs together. I can do this with most persons, but with someone who gives to show that he does not uphold Pride, as I do it, and is even ready to compromise it, this is what automatically begins to happen. His soul begins to disintegrate before my minds eye. If I choose to speak out, this then causes ripples of un-pride across the paradigm, ripples that touch the nerve of Nietzschean pride everywhere.

For as such, as defined as you have it, morality spreads through and lives in the world - when the code is challenged, it becomes active.

I don't understand this, FC, though you explained it in your way.
What does pride have to do with morality?
Well, lol, actually in a sense and unfortunately often morality does seem to have a lot to do with pride, we judge what is moral by our by our own bruised egos and not by what is fair, balanced and harmonious. No sense of equanimity.
Morality has to do with one's sense of right and wrong insofar as human behavior goes and upholding that.
I may be wrong ~~ I'm not really that much of a philosopher lol ~~ but your sense of what pride  here seems to translate to me as ego or your own personal sense of identity. Who can take that away from us? Though at times it might be a good thing when our sense of identity is taken away and we can gain a "truer" sense of who we "really" are.
What part does pride  play where morality goes being that it has in human history lead to many downfalls ~~ for example Hitler's sense of pride in Germany and in himself. What destruction did that lead to?!!!!

But I may be misunderstanding what you're saying here.

Quote :
when the code is challenged, it becomes active

Does it become challenged out  of a sense of pride, because of Pride, or as a result of seeing the necessity of responding for the greater good?
The "greater good" is not usually what is about our own self interest.


Something just seems to be out of tune here. scratch

 

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Each of our lives is a part of the lengthy process of the universe gradually waking up and becoming aware of itself.


Philosophy is the childhood of the intellect, and a culture that tries to skip it will never grow up."


"If I thought that everything I did was determined by my circumstancse and my psychological condition, I would feel trapped."

Thomas Nagel
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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 12:12 pm

Arcturus Descending wrote:
I don't understand this, FC, though you explained it in your way.
What does pride have to do with morality?
Morality has to do with one's sense of right and wrong insofar as human behavior goes and upholding that.
I may be wrong ~~ I'm not really that much of a philosopher lol ~~ but your sense of what pride  here seems to translate to me as ego or your own personal sense of identity. Who can take that away from us? Though at times it might be a good thing when our sense of identity is taken away and we can gain a "truer" sense of who we "really" are.
What part does pride  play where morality goes being that it has in human history lead to many downfalls ~~ for example Hitler's sense of pride in Germany and in himself. What destruction did that lead to?!!!!

Are you saying pride is bad? Ive never heard that in my life, that someone thought that.

I know my mother was proud of me when she got me. Im pretty glad she didnt consider that a sin, or compared herself to Hitler, just because she was proud of her baby!!!

What are you thinking? Pride is bad?

There can be no love without pride. Love is always a very powerful form of pride.  We are proud both of who we love, and of our love. The ability to love is probably the greatest pride, as well as reason for pride in the cosmos.
Did you not feel pride whenever you were in love, or loved a child or animal? Do you not love yourself when you are proud of a generous thing you did that helped some one to put his life back on track?

What of the Jews that refused to bow to Hitler out of pride? What of Churchill who was too pride to compromise with Hitler?
What of the black slaves that set themselves free, because they were too proud to be chained?

Pride is the essential ingredient to human dignity.
Hitler rose because the English and French were one week from splitting up Germany. They tried to work with reality without considering the phenomenon pride. So they created nazism.

Quote :
Quote :
when the code is challenged, it becomes active

Does it become challenged out  of a sense of pride, because of Pride, or as a result of seeing the necessity of responding for the greater good?

How would you define "greater good" if you have nothing to be proud of?

Quote :
The "greater good" is not usually what is about our own self interest.

What? How is the greater good not per definition in ones self interest?

Youve basically defined "good" as "bad" for yourself here, Arc.  
Timer to look at yourself. Something is awry.

 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 12:35 pm

Capable wrote:

I've actually been to Innsbruck one time, great place.

Nice.
Just now a German song sets in in this breakfast place.

Quote :
I think VO describes why institutions are impossible. All the institutions that presently exist flirt with this impossibility as their repressed reality principle, always trying to overcome this limit and always failing to do so. Institutions must be inhuman qua institution, so the trick is to keep a large gap between the hard logic of the institution-ism and the human beings who staff it. This is one applicatiok I came up with for artificial intelligence, that it can take over much of the functions of staffing institutions for doing the menial work. I think we're already moving in that direction.

In as far as institutions have existed, I do believe this is all true, and this interestingly frames AI as a possibility of making imperfection work 'as such' - I dont know let me think more on this

Id like to know more about AI.

Quote :
A single cluster of AI minds could operate even the most massive and complex institutions. But this would put a lot of peoole out of work. That's the contradiction deep in technological capitalism: "work" loses its human-ness and so is eventually to be replaced by non-humans, but by then millions of people are already employed in these heartless systems.

Yes but I do think it is better to sit at home than to do the type of bureaucratic work that comes out of the pure excess of institution. That list of symptoms you posted somewhere was pretty fucking accurate.

Quote :
A family or group of friends is how I think of a VO institution. Not really an institution but a natural rank-ordering as human relationships that also mediates power-concerns. In this way your preference for mafia structures in business and politics makes sense. But there are severe detriments however we look at it, whether there is heartless inhuman bureaucracies of institutions or mafia families in charge. Trump is a little bit of return to the mafia-oriented logic, maybe this is what the inhuman institutional behemoth needs right now.

Thanks for reminding me, after I wrote that post yesterday I wanted to add that VO builds an institution that 'takes on the wings of its most respected members'. Thus, it is the ultimate 'democracy', because it is not representative; rather it makes democracy and meritocracy equal.

Whether or not such an institution merits or becomes a base mafia like coercion system, depends I would say entirely on the 'ingredients' - the people involved -- thus for the US things are looking good in such terms, as well as for the world at large. A philosophic institution had to wait with coming into being, quite logically, until global communication was fleshed out.






 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 2:36 pm

Pride and ego are twins. They both are subject to the same faults and strengths.

Or better perhaps, pride is rooted in ego. Ego is noun and pride is verb.

But still, our pride and ego must reflect reality else we are living in illusion and delusion. That would be contra Nietzsche.

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:26 pm

Ego is the lack of pride. It is the lack of power to nurture oneself by benefiting ones environment.


 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:31 pm

Ego is fear of inner confrontation. Ego is the shell, that rejects experience, and research, and empirical reality, and all powerful things, because it prefers to remain in shallow understanding.

 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 3:33 pm

We will need to agree to disagree on these two concepts.

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 8:03 pm

If Im fully philosophical, I must say that I dont even believe that "ego" exists.

I use the word to indicate some stuff but it's a silly notion to me the way people use it, as if there is a separate I from the I... it's all just words.

We just are. We self-value. Some people like to be generous and creative, others are pieces of shit, that does not mean that the second group has 'bigger ego'. It just means they have no values and thus are themselves of no value.


 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:04 pm

Ego does exist, I believe, in a Freudian sense as opposite to superego and id, namely as translating these to each other in s compromise. But I agree that ego is the opposite of pride.

 

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"We must, now armed with such a language, realize the “transcendental unity of ideas,” through a new morality that aims, not to hypostasize experience and grasp in positive knowledge a series of particular virtues and vices, but rather to fully explicate this continuity; where philosophy exists to represent this transcendental order, morality most exist to mediate the two spheres, the spheres of experience and ideality." -Parodites

"Was it necessary for the sense of truth that Nietzsche described as developed by the Judeo-Christian tradition that then manifested itself in the scientific methodology to turn against the symbolic foundation of that structure and demolish it... Jung's answer was that the conflict between science and religion is a consequence of the immature state of both of those domains of thinking... it's just that we aren't good enough at being religious or at being scientific to see how they might be reconciled." -Jordan Peterson
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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:40 pm

Yes, the Freudian system is pretty elegant and goes a long way in justifying the concept.

I was going to say that if it is the opposite of pride it surely exists... but then - ha. I will shut up now though, as the great Omega rises only when it does.

It's a word foremost, and it refers to a valuable existent in terms of Freudian analysis.

The word literally means "I", in that sense it also exists. We can say it, and it will make sense to a Roman.

 

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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Sun Nov 06, 2016 6:29 am

Fixed Cross wrote:
If Im fully philosophical, I must say that I dont even believe that "ego" exists.

I use the word to indicate some stuff but it's a silly notion to me the way people use it, as if there is a separate I from the I... it's all just words.

We just are. We self-value. Some people like to be generous and creative, others are pieces of shit, that does not mean that the second group has 'bigger ego'. It just means they have no values and thus are themselves of no value.


Now this I can agree with. "Ego" is not a thing - it is a mental concept. It's really just another way of trying to define an individual.
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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:03 am

FC

Quote :
Are you saying pride is bad? Ive never heard that in my life, that someone thought that.

No, I'm not saying that at all. What I am speaking about here is a false kind of pride or vanity which can border on narcissism. I'm speaking about ego, not the kind which adds to our self esteem but to our "false" self, the one which is highly egoistical.
There is a good pride which we we're capable of feelings/experiencing due to our achievements, et cetera, but when that goes overboard than it transcends the good kind of pride.



Quote :
I know my mother was proud of me when she got me. Im pretty glad she didnt consider that a sin, or compared herself to Hitler, just because she was proud of her baby!!!  

lol That's a bit absurd, don't you think? I'm sure that based on your achievements, your mother does have a lot to be proud of.
I mentioned Hitler because of the Pride which he bore, the destructive chauvinism - look where it go the world. But we managed to stifle that nazi pig.



Quote :
What are you thinking? Pride is bad?

No, as I said above. Saying pride is bad is like saying "Life is suffering" to me.
It has to be looked on all sides.


Quote :
There can be no love without pride. Love is always a very powerful form of pride.  We are proud both of who we love, and of our love. .

So, are you saying that your mother would stop loving you, or anyone who loved you, would stop loving you if they stopped being proud of you?

Quote :
The ability to love is probably the greatest pride, as well as reason for pride in the cosmos

scratch I don't understand this, FC, but maybe it's just me. Why do you bring pride into so much?
I would rather use the word gratitude and appreciation. To be able to love someone fills me with both G&A as does to be able to be loved in return.
I'm not the philosopher which you are so maybe in philosophical circles, your above quote could be understood but I don't get it. Doesn't mean you're wrong that I don't get it.


Quote :
Did you not feel pride whenever you were in love, or loved a child or animal? Do you not love yourself when you are proud of a generous thing you did that helped some one to put his life back on track?

Do me a favor and express for me how this "pride" you're speaking about is experienced by you?
Again, I felt/feel more gratitude and appreciation.
Do I feel pride in my son and daughter when they've achieved things? Yes of course I do - again it's a deep sense of gratitude and appreciation and respect for them as human beings. But the love I have for them also retains the pride I feel in them even when I realize that they have their limitations.


Quote :
What of the Jews that refused to bow to Hitler out of pride? What of Churchill who was too pride to compromise with Hitler?

I may be wrong but could that be considered to be "pride" or a deeper sense of self, of who they are/were as Jews and their heritage. Okay, perhaps there is pride within that but I am/was still speaking of the pride which is vanity - for instance, the pride which allows men to think of their selves as God because they are philosophers. Isn't that vanity?

Quote :
What of the black slaves that set themselves free, because they were too proud to be chained?
Same as I said above. A deeper sense of self, who they are/were, despite how they were treated and despite how they were thought of.

Quote :
Pride is the essential ingredient to human dignity.

If you're using Pride to denote a "real" self respect and a "true" sense of self, then yes, I agree with this.
But everything needs to balance itself out. Like Yeats in my signature said "Balance all, call all to mind" though he was speaking of something a bit different at the time.




Quote :
How would you define "greater good" if you have nothing to be proud of?

Does the greater good depend on "pride" though or as something held to be valued and precious? Can we use the word "pride" in that sense"
I think that the word PRIDE has to be looked at in terms of reality, not just subjective thinking - and also in terms of degrees.


Quote :
The "greater good" is not usually what is about our own self interest.


What? How is the greater good not per definition in ones self interest?


Okay, I'll grant you that the greater good could also ALLOW for OUR own self interest but that is not always the higher motivation.
A man enlists and goes off to war knowing that he might not come back. He knows that freedom and liberty, fighting evil is the greater/greatest good.
Is his own self-interest paramount in making this decision, FC? No,it isn't.
There are times when we realize that sacrifices have to be made. It isn't always in our own self interest BUT it is for the greater good of all.



Quote :
Youve basically defined "good" as "bad" for yourself here, Arc.  

No, I haven't FC. There have to be distinctions made. These kind of discussions are not simply black and white. Didn't Nietzsche say that things need to be turned inside out and upside down and perhaps in more different ways than that. I just don't like simple answers that haven't been looked at.
Everything you say can be seen in another way.



Quote :
Timer to look at yourself. Something is awry.
You put that in because I said that something seems to be out of tune. geek
Believe it or not, I do a lot of introspection. I'm  quite aware that at times thins are awry. Are you?[/quote]

 

___________
Each of our lives is a part of the lengthy process of the universe gradually waking up and becoming aware of itself.


Philosophy is the childhood of the intellect, and a culture that tries to skip it will never grow up."


"If I thought that everything I did was determined by my circumstancse and my psychological condition, I would feel trapped."

Thomas Nagel


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PostSubject: Re: What is morality in the practical (Nietzschean) sense?    Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:18 am

Capable wrote:
Ego does exist, I believe, in a Freudian sense as opposite to superego and id, namely as translating these to each other in s compromise. But I agree that ego is the opposite of pride.

Ego isn't the opposite of pride. A false ego is the opposite of a true sense of self-respect, self-identity.
Then of course, there is the conscious self, the ego.

Obviously we have an ego. If we didn't, it would be difficult for us to survive and to have a sense of self-preservation. Ego is only part of our greater self, you might call it Self. It's like a facet on a diamond, one facet.\
Words need to be clarified and to be dived into.


Quote :
But I agree that ego is the opposite of pride

I believe that what you may have been trying to say is that an egoistical attitude may not be based on a true sense of pride. Usually, the former is based on lower self-esteem that is repressed and not wanted to be looked at.

 

___________
Each of our lives is a part of the lengthy process of the universe gradually waking up and becoming aware of itself.


Philosophy is the childhood of the intellect, and a culture that tries to skip it will never grow up."


"If I thought that everything I did was determined by my circumstancse and my psychological condition, I would feel trapped."

Thomas Nagel
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